Cobalt Blue Decor

Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase

Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase
Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase

Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase    Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase

Rare Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase. In perfect condition without any chips cracks or crazing. Please browse all 12 sets of photographs for size, weight and condition as they are self explanatory.

Hjorth (born Lauritz Adolph Hjorth, dated December 27, 1834 in Rønne, died December 9, 1912, together) was a Danish owner of a terracotta factory and pottery. L Hjorth set up his pottery in Bornholm, an island off the coast of Sweden, in 1859. Erik Hjorth, his grandson, who lived from 1906 to 1982, spent his whole working life at the pottery. His work is included in the Milner-White collection. Hjorth was the son of Lars Hansen Hjort born 1794, d.

1880 and Maren Kirstine Knudsen born 1802, d. 1891 and brother of school inspector Andreas Larsen Hjorth. He lived in Østergade in Rønne. He started as an apprentice at Edvard Christian Sonne b. After graduating, he traveled to Germany (Schumann's porcelain factory in Berlin), Switzerland and Northern France to empower himself by working at various ceramics factories. In March 1859 he founded L. Hjorths Terracotta Factory in a small workshop in Østergade where he lived, but later moved to Krystalgade 5 in 1862. Terracotta, stone and faience were produced. Many of his presentations are strongly inspired by the Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen. Hjort was not only a skilled artist, he also realized that if his factory were to survive the other ceramics companies, he would be involved in marketing. In addition, Hjorth participated in countless of today's national and international industry exhibitions and home-made numerous prizes. He announced them in his directories: Nakskov 1868, Altona 1869, London 1870. But Drachmann was also a prize for Lauritz Hjort. His artistic sense meant Drachmann could come up with ideas for new motifs for vases and jars. He had two sons who, after Lauritz's death in 1912, took over the company: Peter Christian Hjorth b. 1959 & Hans Adolph Hjorth b.

1966 wrote in 1960 the book: Bornholm stentøj 1902-12, from L. Also his grandchildren, Erik Hjorth born 1906, d. 1982 and Adolf Hjorth, took over the company as a gift in 1982 to his daughters, the ceramics Ulla Hjorth (born 1945) and Marie Hjorth (born 1941). Lauritz Hjort developed cancer and died in 1912.

He is buried at Rønne Cemetery. The Hjorth Factory was located in Roenne on Bornholm, and island off Denmark, founded in 1859. It operated until 1993 and then re-openend in 1995 as a working museum. For much of its history it was operated by descendants of Lautriz Hjorth, its original founder. Hjorth pottery has obtained large estimation in England and is highly valued in America quotes the notation on the page, and goes on to say the more prominent productions of Denmark are either copies from or adaptions of the forms and ornamentation of Etruria. Between 1862 and 1880 Hjorth ware was represented in World Exhibitions and was highly popular in the big department stores of Paris, London, New York and far away as Australia and the United States.

Around 1900 Jugendstil made its entry at Hjorths, represented mainly by a black burned terracotta. This work was inspired by the style of sculpor Bertel Thorvaldsen whos work was manufactured at Hjorth. The site is updated regularly, and the catalogues might be a bit hard to find, but the website is well worth a look. The Hjorth backstamping is sometimes hard to read, but once you are familiar with it, its quite recognisable. There seem to be quite a few variations on the font, and size of font used.

Sometimes the stamp is Hjorth, Bornhom, and sometimes Hjorth Denmark possibly to do with whether it was for export or not. From 1927 a Deer was added to the backstamps. Most pieces have the shape number written or stamped as well, but as with all pottery there are many exceptions! Alongside this style of pottery, Hjorth also produced from 1927 onwards what became very popular pharmacy jars and storage containers initially in a blue colour, and then in a brown similar to salt glazed ware.

The range was extended over time to include domestic items such as teapots, canisters, mugs etc. During World War II Hjorth had to cease the production of the terracotta coloured decorative ware due to shortages, and instead started the production of white-glazed earthenware fajance, which can also be seen in the catalogues I mentioned above. It was a wide selection of many item-numbers from tea-sets to bowls and dishes often with narrow, close set grooves. This style was designed by Erik Hjorth (Peter Hjorths son).

Most people now recognise Hjorth pottery from the terracotta coloured Art Nouveau pieces of the first part of the 20th Century, but there is so much more to Hjorth pottery than this, which you will see in the following article on this iconic Danish pottery. Cobalt blue is a blue pigment made by sintering cobalt oxide with alumina at 1200 °C. It is extremely stable and has historically been used as a coloring agent in ceramics (especially Chinese porcelain), jewelry, and paint.

Transparent glasses are tinted with the silica-based cobalt pigment smalt. Cobalt glassknown as "smalt" when ground as a pigmentis a deep blue colored glass prepared by including a cobalt compound, typically cobalt oxide or cobalt carbonate, in a glass melt. Cobalt is a very intense glass colorant and very little is required to show a noticeable amount of color. Cobalt blue glass is also used as an optical filter in flame tests to filter out the yellow flame caused by the contamination of sodium, and expand the ability to see violet and blue hues. Cobalt glass is popular with collectors and is appreciated for its attractive color. The item "Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase" is in sale since Thursday, August 30, 2018. This item is in the category "Pottery & Glass\Decorative Pottery & Glassware\Vases". The seller is "santoor-uk" and is located in Manchester . This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Sub-Type: Scandinavian
  • Date Range: 1920-1939 (Art Deco)
  • Boxed/ Unboxed: Unboxed
  • Product Type: Vases
  • Use: Decorative
  • Original/Reproduction: Antique Original
  • Style: Scandinavian Art Pottery
  • Material: Ironstone
  • Manufacturer/ Type: L Hjorth - Denmark
  • Year of Manufacture: 1927
  • Colour: Cobalt Blue
  • Production Style: Art Pottery
  • Production Technique: Pottery

Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase    Antique Art Deco (1927) L Hjorth Danish Cobalt Blue Glazed Pottery 4/10cm Vase